Media briefing on COVID-19 and vaccine equity

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World Health Organization (WHO)

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Hello and good day to wherever you are listening to us today it is tuesday 1st of june 2021 my name is christian lindmeyer and i'm welcoming you to today's press conference on covet 19 updates with a focus on a new joint call on scaling up equitable access to covet 19 vaccines by the heads of the international monetary fund imf the World bank group the world health organization and the world trade organization therefore we have a special guest today miss christolina jorgeva the managing director of the international monetary fund mr david malpass the president of the world bank group dr ngozi ogunjo ivuela the director general of the world trade organization and last but not least dr terraz adam Gabriel director general for the world health organization welcome simultaneous interpretation is provided in the six official languages arabic chinese french english spanish and russian as well as portuguese and hindi now the other participants we will have in the room here are apart from dr tedros dr my mike ryan who will join us shortly the executive director of the health Emergencies program dr maria von kurkov the technical lead for covet 19. dr sumiya swaminathan chief scientist dr bruce elwood senior advisor to the director general dr kate o'brien director for immunization vaccines and biologicals and dr rogerio gaspar director for regulation pre-qualification with this let me hand over to dr tedros For the opening remarks the floor is yours thank you thank you christian good morning good afternoon and good evening yesterday the world health assembly wrapped up a highly productive week of discussions and decisions it was conducted entirely virtually while i both miss and look forward to meeting with colleagues in person i was heartened that together we adapted More than 30 resolutions and decisions on a broad range of health challenges there was a clear consensus that the world needs a stronger doubleho now more than ever and the three recent reviews of the international response to the pandemic reflected the need for a paradigm shift in both the quantity and quality of funding for who member states also Agreed to hold the devilish specialization of the world health assembly in november to consider developing a treaty or convention on pandemic preparedness and response this will be a very important opportunity for a new truly representative inclusive global compact to keep our health systems societies and economies safer But there is still a lot of work to do to end this pandemic while we are encouraged that cases and deaths are continuing to decline in many areas globally there is no room for complacency the consistent use of public health measures in combination with equitable access to medical supplies oxygen tests treatments and vaccines remains critical Tomorrow kovacs college by gavi seppy and who alongside key implementation partner unicef aims to raise critical new funds at its amc summit to further diversify its portfolio and buy additional vaccines for low and lower middle-income countries fully financing kovacs and rta is key to ending the increasingly two-track pandemic And i thank the government of japan for hosting the amc summit and today i'm happy to announce that the synovac coronavac vaccine has been given who emergency use listing after being found to be safe effective and quality assured following two dose of the inactivated vaccine furthermore the easy storage requirements of coronavac Make it very suitable for low resource settings it's now the aids vaccine to receive eul by who it's now crucial to get these life-saving tools to the people that need them quickly overnight i joined leaders from the international monetary fund the world trade organization and the world bank group In publishing an op-ed in many newspapers around the world that calls for a new commitment with a 50 billion us dollars rapid investment to fund the equitable distribution of vaccines and other crucial health tools we particularly welcome that in that in the proposal the majority of the new funding would be made available quickly Through grants including to fill the act accelerates funding funding gap this would help us dramatically scale up the production of diagnostics treatments oxygen medical equipment and vaccines for equitable distribution furthermore this new roadmap reflects the need to enhance country's readiness and capacity systems to utilize these tools rapidly Safely and effectively it should be a real game changer and as g7 finance leaders meet in the uk this week followed by heads of state summit next week there are multiple opportunities for leaders to step up as well as securing funds to roll out health schools equitably now is the moment for leaders to share vaccine rules with Kovacs ensure health workers and other at-risk people are protected and extinguish variants last week i called for all countries companies and partners to work together to vaccinate at least 10 percent of the population of every country by september and at least 30 percent by the end of the year but as we said in our joint op-ed Along with other agreements and surge investment it's possible that we could reach 40 percent by the end of the year through public health measures and vaccines we have the means to end this pandemic quickly and save countless lives and livelihoods but we need the will to make it happen they say where there is a will there is A way we know the way the question is do we have the will to say more about how this can be achieved i'm glad today to be joined by christalina giorgiba the managing director of the international monetary fund cristalina thank you so much for joining us today and you have the floor thank you very much dr tedros for hosting this Press conference and also to you the staff of who and all the health workers for your selfless service to humanity very pleased to join you as well as david ngozi to discuss a matter of great urgency the need to step up multifaceted and coordinated action to fight the pandemic in the parts of the world falling behind mostly because of uneven Distribution of vaccines between richer and poorer countries you may ask why is the imf concerned with vaccinations we are deeply concerned because an increasingly two-track pandemic it is causing a two-track economic recovery with negative consequences for all countries and our data shows that in the near term vaccinating the world is the most effective way to boost Global output in other words vaccine policy is economic policy building on the work of who wto the world bank and many others our staff has put forward a proposal a 50 billion dollars plan to end the pandemic it has three broad elements and as you suggested i would walk everybody on this call through those first Vaccinating at least 40 percent of the population in all countries by end 2021 and at least 60 percent by the first half of 2022 this requires additional upfront grants to kovacs donating surplus doses and free cross-border flows of raw materials and finnish vaccines second insuring against downside risks such as new variants this means investing In additional vaccine production capacity by 1 billion doses diversifying production and scaling up surveillance and contingency plans to handle virus mutations or supply shocks third managing the interim period where vaccine supply is limited with vice widespread testing and tracing therapeutics and public health measures In other words the things will learn work and at the same time ramping up preparations for vaccine dep deployment in the countries falling behind of the 50 billion dollars we envision grand financing of at least 35 billion dollars g20 governments have recognized the importance of providing about 22 billion dollars in additional funding For 2021 to the act accelerator so we need an additional 13 billion dollars in grants the remainder of the financing plan around 15 billion dollars could come from national governments supported by concessional financing from multilateral development banks such as the world bank on the call today the 50 billion dollars price tag Is dwarfed by the estimated nine trillion dollars to be gained by the increase in economic activity by 2025 making it the best public investment ever success depends on speed upfront financing upfront vaccine donation upfront at risk precautionary investments and coordination all parties working in tandem public private international financial Institutions foundations and our four institutions fully subscribed to it we at the imf will not shy away from our own responsibility we will continue to work with the international community towards faster vaccination and faster recovery so we can ensure maximum efficiency and maximum impact from our collective efforts we are considering how to complement Grants and highly concessional financing from others for vaccinations where this is needed and we are preparing a new special drawing rights allocation unprecedented in its size to boost reserves and liquidity of all our member countries bottom line ending the pandemic is a solvable problem But it requires coordinated global action now thank you tedros thank you thank you cristalina i couldn't agree more that this new injection of funds will be critical to increasing the supply of life-saving medical tools and and the pandemic next it gives me great great pleasure to welcome dr ngozi okonjo iwella the director general of the world trade organization Ngozi you have the floor well well thank you dr tedros uh very much uh for having us to today and i just want to make a point i want to also thank christolina and the irs staff for their paper but i want to say that we often talk of collaboration of international institutions and coherence the very fact that the four of us are here today and our institutions represented is very important because we Know it's about saving lives and this is the time we have to work together and we're talking about saving lives of people in developing countries saying that they'll never lag behind that is why we've come together and thank you all i want to thank my colleagues and their staff for bringing us here now there's a joke about two economies out for a walk one one sees a hundred dollar bill on the ground and exclaims look There's a hundred dollar bill on the sidewalk the second economist doesn't even look down she says it can't be a hundred dollar bill if it was someone would have picked it up by now in their imf staff paper as that crystalina talked about we've been shown that they are trillion dollar bills on the sidewalk to pick them up we just need to invest 50 billion dollars up front and we need more cooperation on trade as well after some initial disruptions i just want to tell you the role that trade has played many people are not aware about that that after the initial disruptions in supply chains trade played a critical role in moving medical supplies and goods around for instance in 2020 total global Merchandise shrunk by seven percent in value terms but the value of trade in medical supplies rose by 16 percent trading covered relevant products such as mass ventilator sterilizer and ultrasonic scanners increased by 31 percent trading test kits and diagnostic reagents grew by over 40 percent for personal protective equipment ppe straight grew by 50 percent even with agriculture global agricultural trade remains stable throughout 2020 bolstering food security which was another area of concern for leaders and of course covered 19 vaccines manufacture the multi-country uh value chains we know that these value chains are very sophisticated and complex we've all heard of of the example of the pfizer beyond Tech vaccine using 280 components from 86 sites in 19 countries but it was trade that helped to move these supplies around but we've also had constraints on trade export restrictions are a challenge that we continue to face and monitor while it is positive that the number of measures of export restrictions has come down from 109 at the start of the pandemic to 51 there are signs that trade restrictions Are still coming up covered 19 vaccine supply chains and wearing weighing on production trade policy can help with vaccine scale up in three areas first by freeing up supply chains for raw materials and finished vaccines second by working with manufacturers to make the most of existing production facilities and building new manufacturing capacity especially in Regions that lack it working with manufacturers to keep supply chains open is essential for us to get more vaccines third we know that there is a trip's debate waiver debate going on at the wto and while i cannot take sides we need to get to conclusion on this debate we need to promote also the transfer technology and know-how to get lasting increases In production capacity wto members can and should deliver on all three fronts this year and to echo crystallina we increasingly see a world divided by access to vaccines and by economic prospects the two are of course related that's why she said vaccine policy is economic policy the divergence is visible in the trade data too in europe and North america import volumes are said to surpass pre-pandemic levels this year by 2022 european imports are said to be almost four percent higher and exports 3.5 percent higher than in 2019. over the same three-year period north american imports are said to rise by 9.7 percent and exports by almost four percent Asian imports will grow by a large nine percent and exports by an even larger 12.5 percent but in contrast latin american imports will increase by modest 1.7 and exports by 1.2 percent and in africa imports are only on track to reach pre-pandemic levels by 2022 exports are projected to have risen 2.3 by then so i say also that vaccine policy Is trade policy and vice versa we won't get the vaccine production increase we need without action on trade and without ending vaccine scarcity we cannot get the lasting trade and economic recovery we need we want global cooperation to save lives and pick up those trillion dollar bills thank you [Applause] thank you thank you so much ngozi you Have been fighting this pandemic since the beginning in a variety of roles and i appreciate your point that as well as financing the wto is doing all it can to ensure the smooth flow of vaccines and raw materials across borders to increase access while also accelerating negotiations around intellectual property finally we're joined by david malpass president of the world bank group David thank you so much for joining and the floor is yours thank you very much i joined my colleagues in expressing the urgency to quickly make approved vaccines available to everyone each of us has an important role in this global vaccination effort my immediate priority is for countries that have sufficient supply to quickly release doses to countries That have vaccination deployment programs the world bank has 12 billion dollars in vaccine financing available now and more if needed to help countries buy and distribute covet 19 vaccines and to encourage vaccinations by the end of june we will have approved vaccination operations in over 50 countries these countries can immediately use vaccines from kovacs from manufacturers and from donor Countries themselves as soon as they are made available it's vital that we speed up the supply chain we need to shorten the time from the manufacturing of the vaccine to shots in arms at present too many doses are waiting to be allocated they are they may be stuck in paperwork sitting in inventory somewhere or aren't the type of vaccine the Country is able to use in order to maximize the number of vaccinations doses need to be matched to country programs as soon as they are manufactured it's important to share information about the allocations so countries can plan ahead the world bank is providing transparent access to very detailed information about our Projects through an online portal available at worldbank.org slash vaccines we urge other development partners to publish detailed information about their vaccine financing and deployment programs and their delivery schedules our website also links to the 140 vaccine readiness assessments referred to In our op-ed today these will help us fill capacity gaps and rapidly add more financing operations the financing can be available to countries immediately for the poorest countries it is on grant or highly concessional terms we're also working to expand supply and we'll be making announcements of investments by ifc The world bank group's private sector development art each day counts in providing vaccine supplies to developing countries with deployment programs in place i look forward to working closely with my colleagues on these vital tasks and with that thank you very much thank you thank you so much david and again all the speakers who together have Laid out a comprehensive new health trade and economic roadmap to increase health equity and speed up a truly global and quick recovery i thank you again and christian back back to you thank you very much all thank you dr teddrus with this we opened the round for questions and answers from the media we have a long list already but if you still intend to get into the line please Raise your hand with the raise your hand icon and then mute yourself when it's your turn first question on my list goes to mauling zhang from xinhua marlin please unmute yourself hi can you hear me very well go ahead okay thank you i'm marlene shaw with china xinhua news agency thank you so much for this opportunity i have two questions Firstly i would like like to ask madame gorgieva the imf has been arguing repeatedly that vaccine policy is economic policy do you think all major countries now understand this uh and second question is for all panelists is if possible uh you've all mentioned limited vaccine supply so i was wondering what are the main bottlenecks For expanding vaccine production and supply globally thank you very much thank you very much and let me hand over to christina george eva managing director of the imf thank you very much for this question it is now increasingly clear to leaders everywhere and to ordinary people that we are not going to succeed in overcoming the economic crisis this Pandemic triggered unless we bring the pandemic to a durable end in our engagement with ministers of finance around the world g7 g20 in our own configuration representing 190 countries that is now very clear understanding that we face two problems one the problem of divergence countries with more physical space and rapid Vaccinations are coming out of the crisis fast they're growing but those especially with low vaccination rates are falling further behind and that is dangerous for everyone because it would hold the global recovery back and second that we are creating a breeding ground for mutations unless we act decisively To accelerate the ending of the pandemic everywhere around the world at the imf we are committed to continue to provide credible and up-to-date assessment of how vaccinations are linked to the economic recovery we came up with a huge benefit a huge number nine trillion dollars between now and 2025 should we move with vaccinations much faster everywhere and it is important to recognize that Sixty percent of the benefits of this sixty percent of this nine trillion would go to emerging markets in developing countries but forty percent would go to advanced economies they would generate one trillion dollars of fiscal revenues as a result of global action and we will continue to stay on that message so we mobilize everybody to step forward for the Benefit of all thank you very much for this [Music] maybe the second part of the question we could ask dr ngozi from the world trade organization well thank you very much i mean that's a very important question on limited vaccine supply in the main bottle next let me just name two or three uh we that manufacturers of Themselves pharmaceutical companies talk about first and foremost i think we we have a constraint on manufacturing capacity the world normally has capacity to manufacture about 5 billion doses of vaccines but now we need 10 to 15 billion doses depending on whether we need boosters so this is two to three times the capacity so we just didn't invest enough in manufacturing capacity And that's why we've been working with manufacturers along with dr tedros the w.h.o sepi gavin a vaccine task force to work with the industry to try to rectify this this goes along with issues of transfer of technology and know-how for manufacturing of course including considerations of how to contact a good agreement on on ip issues with of the ip this i think the second factor is raw Material supplies uh that many manufacturers mentioned they are competing with other types of vaccines with cancer drugs for these raw materials and supplies so there's a scarcity i think the third part is skills you know to make vaccines you really need specialized skills because of how quality is so important in the area of vaccines And these are not always in in much supply and then fourth i talked before about export restrictions and prohibitions some countries still have restrictions on raw material supplies moving into supply chains and bureaucracy also in some countries hindering the movement you heard david malpass referred to you know removing bureaucracy facilitating things to move faster So those are four factors that i think we need to work with in order to also boost supplies thank you very much um let me go with the next question in line and that's corinne gretler from bloomberg but at the same time let me please remind everyone looking at the long list of journalists interested in asking questions to please only ask One question at a time thank you very much corrine go ahead hi thanks for taking my question um i'll it's one for the wh o officials um i wanted to ask about the variant first detected in vietnam um which the country's health ministry has said is like a hybrid of the alpha and delta strains so um i just wanted to see you know is the who paying special attention to it what do you know about it so far You know might it be a candidate for um a variant to be a variant of interest just kind of your update on it thank you very much and dr maria van kerkov please thank you for the question and i particularly appreciate you using the new who labels that we announced yesterday so thank you very much for that so yes as you know There are variants that are being detected around the world and this is happening because there's good surveillance for the cyrus kobe 2 virus and there's good genomic sequencing that is happening around the world and that in fact has been increasing since the pandemic began this virus variant that has been detected in vietnam and reported by the ministry of health in Vietnam is the b1617.2 the delta variant that we recently provided a label for to remove some of the stigma associated with the countries that have reported these variants what we understand is that it is this b1617.2 variant with one additional deletion in the location in the spike protein we know that the b1617.2 the delta variants Does have increased transmissibility which means it can spread easier between people it has to do with the mutations that are identified and allowing the virus to adhere to the cell and infect the cell more easily what i think it's important to remember is that all of these variants are combinations of mutations so this has been reported as a hybrid but in fact What it is is it's this one mutation the delta variant with an additional deletion and so what we are really seeing is this convergence of evolution and the changes in these mutations the changes in the virus which is to be expected because with more than 170 million cases reported to date which is truly an underestimate of the of the true number of infections worldwide this Virus will continue to change we're grateful for surveillance to be conducted we are grateful for these variants to be reported we want to encourage this to continue to happen there are studies that are underway to look more carefully at the delta variant and looking at these specific mutations the more we learn about this the more we will report but we do know with increased Transmissibility this means that public health and social measures do work but they do need to be enforced and used and so with the four variants of concern that who's tracking worldwide our public health and social measures continue to work the diagnostics the therapeutics and vaccines are still effective against the variance of concern and so we really need to do What we can to drive down transmission and i will just emphasize that in vietnam they have a lot of experience with infectious diseases and working towards controlling the spread of cyrus kobe 2 and other infectious pathogens so we continue to advise good surveillance to happen worldwide and reporting of this information through these existing systems Thank you very much dr van kerkov we go to margarita serra from tsf radio portugal and i understand we do not have portuguese translation so please use another language thank you margarita can you try to unmute yourself please okay we don't seem to get to her then next in line is neil larson from the afp nina please unmute yourself yes hello thank you for taking my Question um i wanted to go back to the issue of lacking vaccines you're you're calling today for uh an investment of 50 billion dollars for more equitable distribution of the vaccines but even with all the all that money um kovacs is still facing a huge supply gap um it's largely due right now to the situation in india which is cut off supply of uh Representative vaccines from the durham institute um what chances do you see of uh catching up with where you wanted to be with the deliveries uh without the serum to participation and are you expecting the chinese vaccines that have now received emergency use approval to you've been to kovac fill the gap thank you very much nina and dr bruce Elwood i guess thank you thank you very much christian and and thank you i think the one of the key uh findings from the analytics that the imf did is that there are enough vaccines in the world to get to the levels of coverage that are being um let's say aspired to in in the paper now to get there we have the kovac Supplies that get us part of the way there we have additional products coming on in this quarter we are looking as we announced a couple of weeks ago the j vaccine there's additional pfizer product there's additional a z product also coming through there but in addition to that as the as the imf highlights we need uh the countries that have contracted large volumes to be able to donate those doses and at The global health summit we had some great announcements of a commitment from team europe to get to over 100 million doses this year we've seen from the united states the commitment to donate in excess of 80 million doses and these are great the challenge now is going to be to bring the timing forward because the crucial period like you say is in the coming weeks and months if we get behind the eight ball now it's going To be very difficult to catch up and realize the kind of of of benefits that that dr george ever laid out in her comments so the big call is to bring forward those those nations as early as possible to fully finance uh kovacs and the act accelerator so we can further diversify the portfolio like you said there are new products now that have w-h-o-e-u-l and could Potentially be used um and of course we're calling as uh as dr ngozi had mentioned to look at other opportunities to increase the speed with which we can fill finished products and get them used so the bottom line is the vaccines are there in the world to get there the issue is the distribution of those the scaling of those as rapidly as possible And crucially the sharing of those and that's what the call is for to bring all of that forward front load that so we can realize the promise of the plan this bold plan that's been laid out thank you very much dr elwood and i understand we will see if cheetah gopinath the imf economic council and research department director would add something I just uh completely endorse what bruce just said which is if you look at the problem the reason everybody here including the managing director george said that this is a solvable problem is because even under very conservative assumptions you do have a significant amount of vaccines coming through in the pipeline to achieve that 40 target the problem is in terms of who has access to those Vaccines this is why we need upfront vaccine donations also to prevent spoilage so that we're not wasting doses that are sitting in some refrigerator those donations have to be made now we need as dr ngozi said to remove restrictions on exports of raw materials and our finished vaccines these are very small steps actually that are needed this is a good this is a solve of a problem And we can get to these targets as long as we work in in a coordinated fashion thank you very much and just to give you all the name again that was dr guitar gopinath the imf economic counselor and research department lead next question line goes to claudia torrence from the ap claudia please unmute yourself hello can you hear me very well go ahead Great thank you so much for taking my question maybe this is for the international monetary fund um latin america has been very hard hit by the pandemic um could you maybe be a bit more specific and tell us um how of a priority our priority latin america is and how exactly will all these millions Help the region thank you very much and yes miss your giver please and i guess we will ask us mr malpass afterwards yeah yes so the proposal talks about moving vaccines as quickly as possible where they would make biggest impact and one of the observations we make is that while it is important that there is distribution based on population We also have to think about where the urgency to act is most significant and unfortunately for latin america quite a number of countries are hit with a brutal force of covet 19 and therefore what we would argue is to make sure that we have the ability to supply vaccines where we would save most lives covax does have a clause that allows for it And our paper recommends that we are thoughtful and reflectful on that clause i am in constant contact with many of the leaders of latin america and one of the issues each one of them would put on top of list is where are the vaccines even countries that have the money to purchase cannot access them and therefore this mobilization that gita and bruce talked about actions from all Perspectives which is produce more distribute fast to where it is most needed including vaccines that are likely to be in access in the countries that book them do that upfront uh and since i have the floor i want to recognize that we have a gita gobinac who led the work on on the call we also have russia agarwal the other after author of the Plan i cannot tell you how important it is to act comprehensively and not zero in on one only peace and that for latin america is even more important that it is for the rest of the world i want to ask a gita do we want to add anything or we should move to david and we should move to david thank you david thank you uh so it's it's critical to Match the supply with the countries that have programs in latin america we have programs in ecuador el salvador and honduras they're they're seeking 220 million doses so you might say how can that even be possible well that's necessary for for the for the population and for the double doses uh when you when you work it out so we Have financing available and the critical thing then is countries that have excess supply or sufficient supply to free those up that and crystalina made this point and and these are these are critical points that uh as we look at uh the us uh there is uh their their the uh vaccination effort is going to a very young age and so one of the things that needs to be done in a fairness and in the safety for the Whole world we need to be vaccinating vulnerable people around the world right now and that means freeing up the doses to programs that are in place so that's what i'm urging and we're ready to work on new programs we can push new programs through the board very quickly with a fast track approach and there's a receptivity uh to Doing that and we need countries uh to be to be have more confidence crystalline makes this point well uh frequently that one of the key things we're trying to do is build confidence in countries so that they can get their economies going back uh getting back in order so we look forward uh to that but the the critical thing here is to free up excess supplies From those countries that are in access and that oh one positive thing i want to say my impression from the vaccine manufacturers is that their supply is wrapping up very rapidly they're talking about production levels that will reach billions of doses uh in in late this year or into 2022 uh and so uh so this is this is critical these next few weeks Are vital that in particular the u.s frees up excess it to go to programs that exist we're ready to take them tomorrow in the three countries i mentioned and by two weeks from now in more countries within latin america thanks thank you very much both next question goes to valaria roman from infomer valeria please unmute yourself malaria do you hear us Oh hello can you hear me oh hello can you hear me yes here you will oh i am i would like to know uh uh how this uh proposal uh by different uh international organizations can help argentina and other latin american countries with the access to the vaccine exactly thank you very much valeria let me look around maybe dr elwood Sure thank you very much christian i didn't capture the the whole question but if i understood it was specifically how the plan and the actions could actually help countries such as argentina in terms of accessing more vaccines and if that's correct the intent of the plan is to ensure that all countries can access more vaccine more rapidly especially those who Are currently let's say lagging behind the the goals that we've set to be at least 10 percent by the end of september in terms of coverage globally and then to 40 by the end of this year now as dr george eva just laid out in her comments this means there have to be multiple solutions so that means vaccine donations from countries that have contracted lots of doses it means increased production It means freeing up the movement of vaccines as well as the raw materials necessary to do them so the key here is really moving across all of those dimensions to move uh increased volumes globally as rapidly as possible and to try and address gaps in the distribution that we face today so really it's a holistic approach that should benefit all countries certainly economically And all countries in terms of vaccines and then obviously countries in terms of reduced disease ideally and especially mortality and morbidity in the in the near term thank you very much and dr mike ryan please sorry and just maybe in relation to both of those questions not specifically on vaccines but just to reflect on on the fact that the The situation in south america right now remains of very high concern for wh jo and for our colleagues in the pan-american health organization or american regional office in washington uh eight out of the top 10 countries reporting the highest mortality rates per population in the last week have been from the the region of the americas and particularly from South america south american countries represent four of the the top 10 countries uh globally just in case incidents over the last week and those countries include paraguay uruguay argentina colombia brazil followed by bolivia peru and chile so there are there are real challenges uh in in south in south america still and Mortality you know has increased in some countries particularly in paraguay and bolivia um over 20 percent of the last week and when you look at case fatality rates in in in south america in general they are higher than many parts of the rest of the world ranging from three to five percent and and again that may reflect severity of disease but it also reflects Access to to adequate health care and the pressure that the system has been under in many south american countries for a very long time despite the wonderful efforts of healthcare workers and healthcare systems uh to to to do that so test positivity remains remarkably high in some countries in paraguay it's nearly 37 in argentina 33 in colombia 30 percent in ecuador 29 And very few countries actually in south america have rates uh below below 10 so again the disease transmission is intense community transmission is widespread the health care system remains under pressure and that's been reflected in in mortality rates so i think it is very very important and the question was asked the impact the point of impact of this pandemic Shifts and we're moving from looking at the tragedy of india and nepal and that point of impact shifts and it's really been driven by the underlying incidence and the basic capacity of the health system to cope and in the absence of high levels of vaccination they're the two factors that are going to drive the impact of this disease in the coming months how intense is transmission how well is your system able to cope with that Transmission vaccine can break that cycle because right now intense transmission in every country in the world has led to intense pressure on the health system and increasing case fatality rates vaccination can break that cycle continuing to implement public health and social measures can break that cycle but that cycle will continue and we will um unfortunately at the moment i think um if any of you have children you watch Your kids playing football and they all chase around the field after a football because we all chase the thing that's moving and the moving target right now is the point of impact of this pandemic and we have to take a step back and realize we have to break that cycle we simply have to break that cycle and vaccination and increase vaccination roll out A continued support to public health and social measures you see in countries like malaysia today have had to implement very strict public health consortium measures again because they simply do not have the vaccine to make the difference right now so countries who've done well up to now countries who've sustained their effort over many months kept mortality and incidence rates low are struggling to do that a year and a Half into the pandemic struggling to ask their populations to even go further very very hard while they watch other countries being vaccinated left right and center so there are many issues to consider here but i think it is important that we do look uh south america was really in a difficult situation only a couple of months ago and that situation again is starting to turn In the wrong direction and we need to take account of that thank you just to come in briefly on the point that mike was making one of the things that gets lost sometimes in looking at the imf proposal and and uh uh dr george evan you may wish to speak to this crystalline the if you look at the proposal we we talk about the vaccine piece of it but if you Look at the third element of this proposal that uh that christine emphasized it was ensuring that as we are rolling out the vaccines we scale up the tests the oxygen the dexamethasone get the ppe out there in fact if you look at that 50 billion dollar investment the majority of it is to try and get those public health measures out there and scaled rapidly to save Lives and ensure that we are reducing transmission through those measures as mike emphasized so it's not one thing or another it's the whole package faster with the upfront financing needed and the cooperation collaboration internationally to be able to put it all in place thank you very much dr ellwood and since we're running out of time we'll go now to a last round Of comments from our special guests and i'm checking who needs to go first because we have somebody who needs to leave very soon i think that's miss george eva i i thought it was dr ngozi that that had a pressing appointment so i would let her go first thank you very much for this and then dr ngosi please well thank you um all i want to say is that We should just keep in mind that we are talking about saving lives and we have the tools with which to do it we have the finances in the world with which to do it we have the policy mix with which to do it that's why we we've made sure that this op-ed we did went to all the seven uh g7 countries uh before they have their summit so that they'll pay heed A world in which people have to cue in line to get life-saving vaccines when that we have the technology is one that does not work neither for those countries nor for the rich countries i think you've had all the numbers and all the reasons why it doesn't work so i i just want to say to the media you know please help us spread this message It will save lives thank you thank you very much tongozi then now i look at david matas president of the world bank group please thank you very much it's good to be here today the the world is facing these huge challenges and clearly vaccinations are a really good investment and we want to encourage people to take vaccinations uh when they're available and what the The goal of policy is to make them available to the people that are most vulnerable uh that we i think there is an efficient path to making the vaccines available to countries that have vaccination programs that can quickly administer vaccines uh and that have specified which types of vaccines they're prepared to use and so we can Avoid uh the wastage so my my final thought is that we need to measure our success over the next three months by how many people worldwide are vaccinated especially how many vulnerable people are vaccinated and we should be trying to shoot for very high numbers that the vaccines are available we've got to speed up the Pace of connecting them with the demand thanks thank you so much for this and um is crystalina managing director of the imf well thank you very much the approach we have taken is to ask the right question and it is what would it take for recovery to accelerate everywhere and lives that would be lost Unnecessarily to be saved and the answer to this question is in the plan in front of you first we have to set up a target that would lead us to protecting lives and accelerating the recovery 40 this year 60 by the mid of next year rather than asking how much money we can raise we are asking how much can we and must we spend to get to that Target and what would it be necessary in vaccine production the reallocation of excess vaccines overshooting so we can protect against new variants and spreading protection measures that are in between of getting the vaccines and now so we can collectively do as good as job as we now see in countries that are successful the answer to the right Question is one that we are very strongly pressing for all of us to come together and provide to the world and i'm confident that we can't do it am also very very encouraged by the interest we have seen around the world in that plan it is a multifaceted plan it requires all hands on deck and i pledge to you that each and every Pair of hands in the imf is on this deck thank you so much for this and thank you all very much for your participation now before i hand back to dr tedros for the final remarks um we will be sending the audio files and dr tedros remarks right after the press conference that of course the full transcript will be available as of tomorrow on our double joe website for any other Follow-up questions please send an email to media inquiries at w dot int and you'll also receive the press release with the press contacts for the other organizations below with this dr tedros over to you thank you thank you so much christian so i'd like to start by thanking crystalina ngozi and david thank you thank you so much Indeed i think this joint effort i know will help us to defeat this pandemic i think it has been said but i will uh repeat maybe by giving you how the um you know what we're proposing can actually work because it's working in countries where vaccination coverage is better meaning in high-income countries where the access to vaccine is better And those who have vaccinated a significant proportion of their population the coveted situation is declining or the number of cases and this is declining significantly in some countries it's actually nose diving so we have the tool that's why we said we have the public health measures at hand which have been working in many Countries and now we have the added tool vaccine at hand if we do both we can end this pandemic quickly and free this world from this dreadful virus and the only thing which is remaining is as we have said it's the will to really use the tools and share the technology we have share the finance we have And this is in the interest of all nations whether it's low middle or or high income country as cristalina laid out and other colleagues clearly the world could recover faster and all countries can benefit from that fast recovery with this little investment so the message is very very clear so we ask i join my colleagues Ask especially the high-income countries to share those they have and also to help in boosting production and have better access to vaccines and like what we see in high-income countries the situation in low and middle income countries can also improve significantly so the world could could open up every everywhere So with that thank you so much again to to colleagues and look forward to working with you closely to make this proposal happen and thank you so much especially to imf to crystallina for putting together this proposal and i believe that this can really open up the world by ending the pandemic so thank you so much With that i also thank the media who joined today and they look forward to seeing you in our upcoming press thank you

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